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Explore Manchester’s Abandoned Buildings

Explore Manchester’s Abandoned Buildings

From decaying factories to abandoned hospitals, Manchester has a rich history that’s reflected in its abandoned places. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at 10 abandoned buildings and places in Manchester that are just begging to be explored.

So grab your camera, put on your exploring shoes, and read on to discover some of the most fascinating abandoned places in Manchester!

Hulme Hippodrome

Hulme Hippodrome's Homepage
Image by True British Meal via Flickr
HIGHLIGHTSOne of the largest and most elaborate theatres in Manchester, England, known for its unique mix of Baroque and Art Deco architectural styles.
ADDRESS107-115 Princess Road, Hulme, Manchester, England
YEAR BUILT1901
YEAR ABANDONEDThe theatre was closed in 1960 and has been abandoned ever since.

The Hulme Hippodrome was established in 1901 and was a hub for entertainment in Manchester for many years. However, it was abandoned in the 1990s and has remained untouched for over two decades.

Despite its abandonment, the Hippodrome has managed to retain its beauty and charm, and it remains a popular destination for urban explorers and photographers looking to capture its haunting atmosphere. 

I was blown away by the grandeur and elegance of this historic building, despite its current state of decay. In general, I couldn’t help but wonder what kind of events and performances had taken place within its walls over the years.

Although it is now a derelict building and entering it is not recommended due to safety concerns, the unique atmosphere of the place can still be appreciated from a safe distance outside.

Access: Undergoing renovations; Closed to the public

Local Authority: Manchester City Council

Local Group: [email protected]

How to get there: By car or bus; Nearest bus stop is Hulme Library

The Market Centre

The Market Centre's Homepage
HIGHLIGHTSThe Market Centre was a bustling shopping centre located in the heart of Manchester, featuring a wide variety of stores and restaurants.
ADDRESS57-59 Market Street, Manchester M1 1WN
YEAR BUILTThe Market Centre was built in the 1970s.
YEAR ABANDONEDThe shopping centre was closed in the early 2000s and has been abandoned ever since.

The Market Centre, also known by some Mancunians as the Arndale Underground Market, is another fascinating abandoned building in Manchester that’s worth exploring. 

This multi-story structure was once a bustling shopping centre in the heart of the city, with a wide variety of shops and stalls catering to all kinds of customers. 

However, like many other shopping centres in the area, The Market Centre eventually fell victim to changing times and trends, and it was forced to close its doors.

Today, the building stands abandoned, with shattered windows and graffiti-covered walls. It’s a stark reminder of a bygone era, but it still holds a certain appeal for those who love to explore abandoned places. 

Exploring The Market Centre is a fascinating and eerie experience, and it’s a great way to get a glimpse into Manchester’s past. For brave urban explorers and photographers, it’s a great opportunity to capture unique and haunting images of an iconic building.

Access:  Not open for any public events or activities at this time.

Local Group: https://www.mandg.com/

Local Authority: https://www.manchester.gov.uk/

How to get there: The nearest tram stop is Exchange Square, which is served by several tram lines.

Old Adelphi Building

Old Adelphi Building's Homepage
HIGHLIGHTSThe Old Adelphi Building was a historic landmark in the city of Salford, England, known for its unique architectural style and connection to the University of Salford.
ADDRESSUniversity Rd, Salford M5 4BR, United Kingdom
YEAR BUILTThe building was completed in 1856.
YEAR ABANDONEDThe Old Adelphi Building was closed in 2011 and has been abandoned since then.

However, there are plans to convert the building into a hotel and conference centre in the future.

The Old Adelphi Building is another must-visit abandoned place in Manchester that’s sure to leave a lasting impression on anyone who visits. 

This stunning 19th-century building was once home to the University of Salford’s School of Art and Design, and it was a hub of creative activity (indoor activities manchester) and inspiration for many years.

Despite its grandeur and rich history, the Old Adelphi Building now stands abandoned and neglected, with broken windows and crumbling walls. 

Old Adelphi Building

However, even in its abandoned state, the building still manages to captivate and inspire, with its elegant architecture and intricate details still visible beneath the layers of decay and neglect.

The dilapidated state of the building, with broken windows and boarded-up entrances, serves as a stark reminder of its abandoned status. Despite this, the Old Adelphi Building remains a significant landmark for art enthusiasts and history buffs alike. 

Its grandiose features and cultural significance are undeniable, representing a piece of Manchester’s rich heritage.

Although access to the building is restricted, its historical significance and aesthetic charm are enough to inspire a sense of awe and wonder, even from the outside. 

The architectural beauty and cultural significance of the Old Adelphi Building make it an essential part of Manchester’s history that cannot be ignored.

Access: The Old Adelphi Building is currently closed and abandoned.

Local Authority: ​​https://liverpool.gov.uk/

How to get there: The nearest tram stop is Salford Central, which is served by several tram lines.

The Church of Scientology

The Church of Scientology's Homepage
HIGHLIGHTSThe building, which was formerly a distillery owned by the Duckworth family, was purchased by the Church of Scientology and renovated to serve as a church facility in Manchester.
ADDRESS231-235 Deansgate, Manchester, M3 4EN, United Kingdom
YEAR BUILTThe original distillery building was constructed in the late 1800s.
YEAR ABANDONEDThe building was purchased by the Church of Scientology in 2007 and renovated for use as a church facility.

The Church of Scientology in Manchester is an abandoned building that’s sure to intrigue and captivate anyone with an interest in history and urban exploration. 

This striking building, which was once a hub of activity for the controversial religious organisation, now stands abandoned and neglected, with broken windows and overgrown weeds.

Despite its current state of disrepair, the Church of Scientology still exudes a certain sense of grandeur and intrigue that’s hard to ignore. Its imposing exterior, with its towering columns and intricate stonework, is a testament to the building’s rich history and grandiose past.

The Church of Scientology

Exploring the abandoned Church of Scientology is a unique and unforgettable experience, as you navigate its maze-like corridors and marvel at its grandiose features. 

As you wander through the empty rooms and hallways, you can’t help but imagine the many meetings and ceremonies that once took place within its walls, and wonder what stories this abandoned building still holds.

For those with an interest in the history of religion and spirituality, the Church of Scientology is an absolute must-visit destination. 

It’s a haunting and poignant reminder of the controversial past of this religious organisation, and a testament to the many different beliefs and practices that have left their mark on Manchester over the years.

Access: The Church of Scientology is a privately owned building that is open to the public for certain events and activities. However, some areas of the building may be restricted to members only.

Local Group: https://www.scientology.org/

How to get there: It is easily accessible by car or public transportation. The nearest train station is Bury, which is served by several train lines.

Chorlton Swimming Baths 

Chorlton Swimming Baths' Homepage
HIGHLIGHTSChorlton Swimming Baths was a historic swimming pool complex located in the Chorlton district of Manchester, England. 
It was a popular local attraction for over 80 years, and it was known for its Art Deco architecture.
ADDRESSManchester Rd, Manchester M21 9PQ, United Kingdom
YEAR BUILTThe swimming pool complex was built in the late 1920s.
YEAR ABANDONEDChorlton Swimming Baths closed in 2013 after a long period of declining usage, and it has been abandoned since then. 

The thought of exploring an abandoned building with such an intriguing history and stunning Art Deco features filled me with excitement as I imagined entering the Chorlton Swimming Baths.

Despite the building’s current state of neglect, I could still envision the vibrant activity that once filled the halls, and I felt a sense of reverence for the history that was embedded within its walls.

With its broken windows and overgrown vegetation, the Chorlton Swimming Baths offered an almost mystical atmosphere, drawing me in with a magnetic pull. 

I didn’t have the opportunity to physically visit the site, but as a fitness and health enthusiast, I was fascinated by its unique historical significance. 

I was intrigued to learn about the various physical activities that had occurred within its walls and the rich history of health and fitness in Manchester. 

I was eager to witness the building’s grandeur and elegance up close and personal, but unfortunately, I could only imagine what it would be like to see it from the street.

Access: The Chorlton Swimming Baths is currently closed and abandoned.

Local Group: https://www.better.org.uk/

Local Authority: https://www.manchester.gov.uk/

How to get there: It is easily accessible by car or public transportation. The nearest tram stop is Chorlton, which is served by several tram lines.

Wheatsheaf Shopping Centre

Wheatsheaf Shopping Centre's Homepage
HIGHLIGHTSWheatsheaf Shopping Centre was a small shopping mall located in the Ancoats neighbourhood of Manchester, England. 
It was a popular shopping destination for local residents and visitors to the area.
ADDRESSNew Retail Park, Oldham Rd, Manchester M4 6AG, United Kingdom
YEAR BUILTThe shopping centre was built in the late 1980s.
YEAR ABANDONEDThe shopping centre was closed in 2016 and has been abandoned since then. 

The Wheatsheaf Shopping Centre is an abandoned building that’s bound to pique the interest of anyone who loves to explore forgotten spaces and lost pieces of history.

It’s a sprawling complex that once buzzed with activity from shoppers and retailers, but now stands empty and forgotten, with broken windows and overgrown weeds.

Despite its current state of neglect, the Wheatsheaf Shopping Centre still radiates a certain sense of grandeur and commercial energy that’s hard to ignore. 

Its vast layout and diverse array of shops and services are a testament to the building’s rich history and the many different businesses and industries that have left their mark on Manchester over the years.

Wheatsheaf Shopping Centre

As you make your way through its maze-like corridors and explore its empty shops and storefronts, you can’t help but feel a sense of curiosity and wonder about what the building once looked like when it was filled with bustling shoppers and lively retailers.

For those who are interested in the history of commerce and retail, the Wheatsheaf Shopping Centre is a must-visit destination. 

It’s a haunting and poignant reminder of the different ways people have shopped and conducted business over the years, and a tribute to the many different forms of consumerism that have left their mark on Manchester.

Access: The Wheatsheaf Shopping Centre is a publicly accessible shopping centre. It is open to the public during regular business hours.

Local Group: https://www.nrr.co.uk/

Local Authority: https://www.rochdale.gov.uk/

How to get there: It is easily accessible by car or public transportation. The nearest bus stop is Rochdale Interchange, which is served by several bus lines.

The Toast Rack Building

The Toast Rack Building's Homepage
HIGHLIGHTSWas originally built as a college for teacher training and was later used as office space for Manchester Metropolitan University.
ADDRESSWilmslow Road, Fallowfield, Manchester, M14 6HR, United Kingdom
YEAR BUILTThe building was constructed between 1960 and 1962.
YEAR ABANDONEDThe building was closed following a reorganisation of Manchester Metropolitan University’s departments and faculties in 2013 and has been abandoned since then.

The Toast Rack Building is an iconic structure located in Fallowfield, Manchester. It’s a unique piece of architecture that once housed the Manchester Metropolitan University’s Faculty of Art and Design. 

Its distinctive name comes from its unusual shape, which resembles a traditional toast rack, with a series of rectangular towers arranged in a row. Despite its interesting design and historical significance, the Toast Rack Building has been abandoned for several years now. 

Its once-bustling hallways and classrooms are now empty and silent, with only the sound of the wind and occasional pigeon coo to be heard. However, the building’s abandoned state only adds to its allure for those who enjoy exploring abandoned places

The Toast Rack Building

Although the Toast Rack Building is currently inaccessible to visitors, I feel curious and excited about what it would be like to explore its empty halls and witness the art that was created there in the past. 

It’s interesting to imagine stepping back in time to an earlier era of education in Manchester. For anyone with a passion for urban exploration, architecture, or the history of education, the Toast Rack Building is an absolute must-see destination. 

Despite its restricted status, the building’s unique and fascinating features make it a true gem of Manchester’s cultural heritage.

I can only hope that one day I’ll have the chance to step inside and explore the Toast Rack Building for myself, to experience its hidden wonders, and to appreciate the history that it holds.

Access: It is not open to the public, and access to the building is prohibited for safety reasons.

Local Group: https://www.mmu.ac.uk/

Local Authority: https://www.manchester.gov.uk/

How to get there: The nearest bus stop is Withington Library, which is served by several bus lines.

Park Hall Hotel

Park Hall Hotel's Homepage
HIGHLIGHTSThe hotel was known for its picturesque location and was a popular wedding and event venue.
ADDRESSCharnock Richard, Chorley PR7 5LP, United Kingdom
YEAR BUILTThe hotel was originally built in the early 20th century as a private residence and was later converted into a hotel in the 1960s.
YEAR ABANDONEDThe hotel was closed in 2018 following financial difficulties and has been abandoned since then. 

The Park Hall Hotel, located in the outskirts of Manchester, was once a thriving destination for travellers seeking a serene getaway from the bustling city. 

The hotel’s stunning architecture and picturesque grounds drew visitors from far and wide. Its elegant facade welcomed guests with a sense of grandeur and sophistication.

However, the Park Hall Hotel has now been abandoned for several years. The once-beautiful building has fallen into a state of disrepair, with shattered windows and crumbling walls. 

The overgrown weeds and wildflowers on the grounds add to the eerie and desolate atmosphere.

Park Hall Hotel

As I gaze upon the Park Hall Hotel from a distance, my curiosity is piqued by the faded grandeur of its decaying facade. 

It’s truly disappointing that the Toast Rack Building is restricted and off-limits to visitors. However, I still feel a strong desire to explore its empty hallways and contemplate the experiences of the people who lived there.

This magnificent building is frozen in time, a testament to the passage of time and the transience of even the most magnificent things in life. 

Although the Park Hall Hotel is currently in a dilapidated state, it remains a haunting and beautiful reminder of the human spirit’s resilience. Its walls may be crumbling, but the memories of those who once lived and worked there will forever echo through its halls.

Despite its current state of restriction, the Park Hall Hotel is a must-see destination for anyone with an appreciation for history and the beauty of decay. 

It’s a place that speaks to the soul and invites us to contemplate the impermanence of even the most grand and majestic things in life.

Access: The abandoned hotel is currently closed and not open to the public.

Local Group: https://lavenderhotels.co.uk/

Local Authority: https://www.chorley.gov.uk/

How to get there: The nearest train station is Chorley, which is served by several train lines.  

Frozen Farmhouse

Frozen Farmhouse's Homepage
HIGHLIGHTSDepicts the eerie interior of a property in Blackpool that looks frozen in the past.
ADDRESSBlackpool, Lancashire
YEAR BUILT1950’s
YEAR ABANDONEDAround 1950s

The Frozen Farmhouse is a mysterious and intriguing abandoned building located on the outskirts of Manchester. 

The origins and history of the farmhouse are unknown. For me, this adds to its allure and makes it a popular destination for urban explorers and thrill-seekers.

Looking at the photos of the Frozen Farmhouse, one can’t help but be struck by its eerie and desolate atmosphere. Its exterior is in a state of advanced disrepair, with shattered windows, overgrown vegetation, and crumbling walls. 

Frozen Farmhouse

I can’t help but feel a sense of intrigue and fascination about this enigmatic and abandoned place. Though it may not be open for visitation, its mysterious and frozen-in-time atmosphere still captures my imagination.

I can only imagine what secrets and stories lie within its peeling wallpaper, creaking floorboards, and abandoned possessions scattered throughout the empty rooms. The ghosts of past residents still seem to haunt this place, adding to its eerie and unsettling atmosphere.

Its derelict state and haunting backdrop provide a unique opportunity to capture stunning and unforgettable images, and perhaps even uncover some of the mysteries that this abandoned place holds.

Access: The Frozen Farmhouse is an abandoned building that is not open to the public. 

How to get there: It is easily accessible by car or public transportation. However, attempting to enter the building is prohibited for safety reasons.

FAQs about Abandoned Buildings in Manchester

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